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September 2010 Archives

Federal Govt., New Jersey Address Distracted Driving

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration ("NHTSA"), approximately 18 percent of all drivers killed in car and other motor vehicle accidents across the United States last year - about 5,500 drivers - died because they were distracted by cell phones, portable computers, eating, personal grooming or other activities.

Garfield Man Charged in Road Rage Incident

A quote from one of our previous car accident blogs, in which we discussed a notable trend of increasingly aggressive drivers in North Jersey, seems an eminently suitable introduction to this posting. "Civility and courtesy have left our roadways," said August "Chip" Greiner, deputy director of the Bergen County Policy Office of Highway Safety. "More people are using a car as a weapon." (Please see our August 13 post).

Goal: Reduce Child Deaths Through Proper Safety Seat Use

Virtually every parent has bent over in the back seat of his or her vehicle and fiddled with the child safety seat, checking the belt, wondering whether the seat should face toward the front or the back, concerned that everything is being done right and promotes maximum safety.

Single Day Features Spate of Accidents across North Jersey

Several of our recent blogs have drawn attention to the fact that drivers across North Jersey need to pay acute attention when they're on the road. One of our postings chronicled the views of traffic officials and safety experts across the state, summed up collectively by a Bergen County highway spokesman's comment that, "More people are using a car as a weapon." Another blog discussed the strong efforts being made in the state to keep people safe under traffic conditions that, when measured to those in other states, are comparatively challenging; the daily driving routines of many New Jersey motorists place them on busy and, often, very constricted roadways.

Highway Report: New Jersey Working Hard, But Challenged

New Jersey seems to be a bit of an anomaly in the most recent national highway report, with rankings that range from the near top to the very bottom across a number of measured areas. Overall, those numbers seem to point to a state that is working hard to decrease fatalities in car accidents, while doing so in an environment fraught with infrastructure challenges.

Texting Accident A Timely Reminder of NJ Laws

New Jersey has always taken a tough stance toward driving while using a cell phone or texting, seeing the two activities as closely linked with car and other motor vehicle accidents. The state became one of the first to ban talking on a hand-held phone while driving, doing so in 2004. In November 2007, that law was amended to make cell phone use - unless done with a hands-free device - a "primary" offense resulting in a $100 fine. A primary offense is distinguished from a secondary offense, which is still the law in many states and allows for ticketing only if a driver is first stopped for another moving violation.

Traffic Experts Focus on Buckling up in the Rear Seat

Pam Fischer, the New Jersey Division of Highway Traffic Safety Director, uses this imagery-laden language to describe an unbuckled rear-seat passenger in a car accident: The unbelted rider is "a back-seat bullet" moving at the same speed as the vehicle until it hits something.

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